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Aiding and abetting a criminal offence uk athletics

Rape Sexual assault Sexual Offences Act Riot Violent disorder Affray Unlawful assembly Fear or provocation of violence Harassment, alarm or distress intent aggravates Public Order Act Incitement to ethnic or racial hatred Nuisance Causing Public nuisance Outraging public decency Effecting a public mischief Keeping a disorderly house Preventing the lawful burial of a body Breach of the peace Rout Forcible entry Accessory legal term Misconduct in a public office Misfeasance in public office Abuse of authority Perjury of oath Dereliction of duty.

Forgery Cheating the public revenue Uttering. English law portal For obsolete aspects see History of English criminal law table. Categories : Bare-knuckle boxing English criminal case law in case law in England in British law United Kingdom law stubs Crime stubs Boxing stubs. Hidden categories: All stub articles. Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version.

Add links. Queen's Bench Division. Referral from Magistrates Court certifying they were uncertain in law as to their decision ; Divisional Court in turn referred matter to Crown Cases Reserved drawing on a larger panel of judges. Actual bodily harm brutal sport propensity to result in actual or grevious bodily harm prize-fighting bare-knuckle fighting in public place. Prosecutors should also note R v Curtis [] EWCA Crim , which concerns the making of an order against a first time offender involved in large scale disturbances.

Prosecutors should note that deterrence is only a factor to be borne in mind in determining the application; it is not the decisive factor, so that an order will not inevitably follow from a conviction for a football related offence R v Boggild and Others [] EWCA Crim Evidence in support may include a match ticket, programme, fanzine, season ticket, train tickets, football related paraphernalia i.

When the application is made under s. Although Rule It is vital that the prosecutor signs the application at the earliest opportunity. A notice of appeal by either party in relation to the granting or refusal of a FBO must be made no later than 21 days after the decision was made. Annex C and Annex D contain checklists of matters which prosecutors should consider when making an application for a FBO. Where appropriate, consideration should be given to diversion by way of a Youth Caution.

If the offending cannot be satisfactorily addressed by a Youth Caution, then consideration should be given to a Youth Conditional Caution. For further information, prosecutors should consider the separate legal guidance on Youth Offenders and the Director's Guidance on Youth Conditional Cautions. There is a potential conflict between the duty to remit young offenders to the youth court for sentence under s.

This conflict has resulted in youths convicted of football related violence and disorder being remitted to their home courts and subsequently applications for Football Banning Orders have been rejected. Where, however, it is clear that the case is likely to be contested and there are potentially a number of civilian witnesses, then it may be necessary to charge and bail the youth to the "away" court. After conviction, it will be necessary for the prosecutor to make representations, citing the exception in section 8 2 of the Act, stating that it would be undesirable to remit the case to the "home" court, as it would deprive the prosecution of the ability to apply for a banning order.

Careful consideration should be given before a youth is jointly charged with an adult, to avoid the potential problems dealt with above. In cases of large scale disorder it is good practice to charge each defendant separately and for youths to be charged to the "home" court and for the adults to be charged to the "away" court.

When made following conviction under s. If no immediate imprisonment is ordered, the maximum is 5 years and the minimum 3 years. If made under the section 14B, the maximum period of the order is 5 years and the minimum is 3 years. By virtue of s. Section 23 provides that the court has firstly to make a declaration of relevance and can only do so once it is satisfied that the prosecutor has served a notice on the defendant at least five days before the first day of the trial or the hearing of the application indicating that the prosecution propose to show that the offence related to football matches.

The court can waive the requirement for full notice to be given if satisfied it is in the interests of justice. The defendant may also waive away his rights for full notice. A finding by the court that the offence was football related can be appealed as part of an appeal against sentence. It is important to ask the court to waive the requirements if an offender appears in custody and is dealt with at first hearing.

Prosecutors should agree with the police that a notice will be served on the defendant at the time of charge, and provision made for proving service so as to satisfy the court. It is likely that the court will require a copy notice. Prosecutors should ensure that there is sufficient evidence to prove relevance to a football match and should not feel limited to incidents arising at or near the ground.

The courts have stated that it is a matter of judgment whether any of the offences are "related to football matches" see R v Doyle Ciaran and Others [] EWCA Crim and it is perfectly possible for the alleged behaviour to include incidents some considerable distance away from the ground, where the offender is not even a supporter of either team playing. It will usually be obvious from the circumstances but, if not, additional evidence should be requested from the police.

FBOs have successfully been sought for offences over two miles from the ground and five hours after the end of the game, as well as for offences on the national rail network some distance from the game. The court may conduct a hearing analogous to a Newton Hearing to determine the question of relevance. Prosecutors should be properly prepared for such hearings. The use of CCTV evidence may be very persuasive. Prosecutors should view CCTV material, with the intention of minimising the number of police officers attending court to give evidence.

A person who has been given a Football Banning Order FBO must report to a specified police station within five days, and surrender their passport when required by the Enforcing Authority the Football Banning Orders Authority , and report to a police station during the "control periods" associated with "regulated football matches" outside of the UK see s. Football Banning Orders can be made more effective by the use of schedules containing additional restrictions, such as a restricted zone around a ground for a period of two hours before to two hours after a match, and a prohibition on using the national rail network without the prior approval of the British Transport Police.

Other restrictions may be imposed. The police, especially the Football Intelligence Officer, may have views on what may be effective restrictions on particular individuals. The police may impose conditions from the moment they deem there is sufficient to charge and would have charged but for the Director's Guidance on Charging. The police may also impose conditions on bail following a release under section 37 2 PACE even if there is insufficient to charge but this should only be imposed where, in the event of a breach, the police investigation is likely to produce a charging decision.

Where there is a major operation, this may cause considerable pressure on short term court listing. CPS Areas will need to liaise with the court for an agreed strategy to deal with large number of offenders in custody and on bail. Additional security may be required to safeguard the court and officials. The court may, on application by the prosecutor, order a person on whom a Football Banning Order has been made to attend a specified police station within seven days at a specified time to have a photograph taken, section 25 of the Public Order Act A power of arrest exists for non-compliance.

All Areas should have at least one nominated "lead football prosecutor". Best practice is for there to be one nominated prosecutor attached to each Premiership and Football League Club, with one "lead" as overall coordinator for the Area, although it is accepted that this may not always be practicable.

The success of the improved outcomes will depend on closer working with the police at a senior level. It has proved to be highly beneficial for the Chief Crown Prosecutor or senior lawyer to liaise with the relevant Police Commander in charge. For specific events, where trouble is anticipated or agreed enforcement action is to take place, it is best practice to have a charging lawyer on duty who will deal with the early advice and charging and through case ownership, and will deal with any subsequent advocacy.

Enforcement action in connection with football matches will be of interest to the media. A good media strategy will boost public confidence in local criminal justice agencies. Professional and semi-professional football provides an opportunity for people from all walks of society and from all parts of England and Wales to follow their sport, to travel around the country and to meet and mix with other football fans.

Many fans also follow their national team abroad as well as following those clubs that compete in European competitions. The overwhelming majority of football fans are well-behaved and want nothing more than to attend games free from the fear of violence, disorder, discrimination and other crime. In recent years there has been an increase in families and diverse communities attending games together, encouraged by the friendlier atmosphere at grounds.

Members of the community whose homes and businesses are close to football grounds have the right not to have their lives disrupted by football hooliganism. Those who work in and around football grounds providing a service to fans, and those who provide the transport services that allow them to travel also have the right to carry out their work without fear of violence, discrimination or intimidation.

Our legislation concerning football matches and disorder associated with them is widely recognised by other jurisdictions as the most effective in this field. The success of the legislation, and in particular the use of Football Banning Orders has excluded offenders from the vicinity of football matches, has deterred others from becoming involved in violence and disorder and has enabled levels of policing at matches to be reduced.

This has been achieved by a combination of self-policing by fans, high quality police investigations producing compelling evidence, and robust prosecutions where appropriate. This means that there will be a presumption of prosecution whenever there is sufficient evidence to bring offenders before a court on appropriate criminal charges and where a Football Banning Order FBO is considered necessary.

As well as tackling violence, disorder and criminal damage we will deal robustly with offences of racist and homophobic and discriminatory chanting and abuse and other types of hate crime. We recognise, as do the overwhelming majority of decent fans, that there is a place for humour in football but where the line between humour and offensive behaviour is crossed then positive action will be taken.

We will also take firm action against those guilty of ticket touting which will include an application for a FBO. We will deal with emerging challenges such as the use of pyrotechnics and pitch incursions involving assaults on players or football officials. Their FBO will also require them to surrender their passports and may prevent them travelling anywhere abroad during the tournament.

It will also prevent them travelling to any football matches qualifying or 'friendly' fixtures and following their club abroad to European games. The NPCC and the CPS work closely with the Home Office and other government departments in a continuing effort to combat violence and disorder around football matches at home and abroad.

They also work closely with colleagues in Scotland and Northern Ireland to provide consistency across all three jurisdictions in the United Kingdom. The NPCC and the CPS wish to reassure decent football fans that their right to follow their teams in safety will be protected by this policy. The NPCC and the CPS also wish to reassure members of the public who live and work close to football grounds that their right to carry on their lives and businesses free from football related crime will be protected by this policy.

The Code for Crown Prosecutors is a public document, issued by the Director of Public Prosecutions that sets out the general principles Crown Prosecutors should follow when they make decisions on cases. This guidance assists our prosecutors when they are making decisions about cases. It is regularly updated to reflect changes in law and practice. Contrast Switch to colour theme Switch to blue theme Switch to high visibility theme Switch to soft theme.

Search for Search for. Top menu Careers Contact. Principle The CPS and Police are committed to taking a robust stance towards tackling football related disorder and hooliganism. Offences: Charging Considerations General Most offences that are football related will be covered by legislation that prosecutors are already familiar with, for example offences under the Offences against the Person Act and offences under the Public Order Act Specific Offences Football Offences Act Throwing of missiles onto the playing area or into the crowd - s.

Act Carrying alcohol in vehicles on route to designated sporting events - ss. Charges Prosecutors should select charges that adequately reflect the nature and seriousness of the offending and give the court adequate sentencing powers. Prosecutors should note that: Where there is sufficient evidence, it would normally be preferable to charge one of the offences under more general legislation, the football-specific offences referred to above are summary only and non-imprisonable, thereby limiting the court's sentencing powers.

Most of the offences that are likely to be charged are relevant offences for the purposes of obtaining a Football Banning Order FBO. The list at Annex B : Schedule of Relevant Offences should be checked before proceeding to ensure that the court is not deprived of the ability to impose an FBO on conviction. Offences: Public Interest Considerations Football-related offending causes direct harm to law abiding supporters, those who work in football grounds and in the communities surrounding football grounds.

Conditions may include: Not to attend any regulated football match or a particular football ground, with the additional condition to report to a particular police station at kick off times. The period should never exceed 3 months and should be for as short a period as is necessary and proportionate in relation to the offence and the offender; for example for a minor infraction, a period of a month would be a considerable hardship. Not to approach an individual or go to a particular location; for example, a public house close to a football club.

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In the highly unlikely event that a prosecution does not proceed on public interest grounds, prosecutors must discuss their decision with the police at the appropriate level including the Football Intelligence Officer, where appropriate.

Prosecutors must ensure that the file contains a detailed review showing that there are clear and appropriate grounds for not proceeding with the football-related matter s. Simple Cautions or Penalty Notices for Disorder will hardly ever be appropriate for football-related offences. Conditional cautions may be available where the suspected offence is not a hate crime or an offence of domestic abuse. Conditional cautions should be reserved for minor offences committed by persons who have no previous record of football related, public order, assault or criminal damage offences.

Football Banning Orders FBO on conviction cannot be obtained on the back of any out-of-court disposals. Where, however, an offender fails to comply with a conditional caution in relation to a football related offence, they will be liable for an application for a FBO to be made should the original offence be prosecuted. The fact that such a disposal was made could be used as evidence to support a civil application for an order.

Where a person is convicted of a relevant offence see below and there are reasonable grounds for believing that a FBO would help to prevent violence or disorder at regulated football matches, a condition caution would not be appropriate.

Prosecutors should have regard to the Director's Guidance on Adult Conditional Cautioning in deciding whether such a disposal is appropriate. Conditional cautions may also be appropriate for anti-social behaviour in and around football matches that could not be properly classified as football related. Whenever a conditional caution is under consideration for a football related offence, the prosecutor must ensure that the Football Intelligence Officer is consulted before a final decision is made.

This consultation should be recorded on the MG3 to the effect that the offender is not considered a "risk supporter". Football-related offences are not subject to any pilot initiatives around the use of a range of "Out of Court Disposals". Prosecutors must apply for a Football Banning Order FBO whenever a person is convicted of a relevant football-related offence, unless there are exceptional reasons for not doing so.

For most supporters it is the thought of receiving a FBO that they fear most and, as such, its deterrent effect cannot be under-estimated. Most football-related disorder takes place away from football grounds, often affecting local public houses, railway and bus stations. Organised disorder can involve rival groups of supporters meeting some distance from the ground. The mere fact that offending takes place away from the ground should not be a reason why an order should not be sought.

Where a person is convicted of a "relevant offence", the court must make a FBO in addition to any sentence for the offence, if it is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to believe that it would help to prevent violence or disorder see below at or in connection with any regulated football matches s. If the court is not so satisfied, it must state its reasons in open court s. It is advisable to consider the list of relevant offences when advising the police, or making a charging decision Annex B.

Where the offences have been charged by the police under the Director's Guidance on Charging, the reviewing lawyer or associate prosecutor should check that a football related offence has been charged where possible, and that the evidence exists to enable the court to make a "declaration of relevance" see below. Where good grounds exist and the court have refused to make a FBO, a full file note should be kept of the reasons given for not making an order and for urgent consideration to be given to lodging an appeal to the Crown Court or Court of Appeal under s.

An appeal to the Court of Appeal can only be lodged if the judge grants a certificate that his decision is fit for an appeal s. It is advisable that the prosecutor seeks advice from the Area Football Lead Prosecutor before lodging an appeal.

Prosecutors should be aware that a court may remand an offender if proceedings are adjourned, s. The court must make an order if satisfied that the respondent has at any time caused or contributed to any violence or disorder in the UK or elsewhere and that there are reasonable grounds to believe that it would help to prevent violence or disorder at or in connection with any regulated football matches.

For s. The terms "violence" and "disorder" are not limited to violence or disorder in connection with football. The courts are given a wide discretion of what to take into account in making an order under s.

It can include decisions of foreign courts, evidence of deportation from another country and removal from football matches wherever this occurred and visually recorded evidence such as CCTV. The court can consider the conduct of the respondent at any time in the ten years leading up to the making of an order. If there is insufficient evidence to prosecute a football-related offence or the defendant is acquitted, it may still be possible to apply for an order under s.

Prosecutors should discuss with police officers in order to establish whether there is enough evidence to support the complaint. Whether the application is made under s. In all cases the prosecutor should ensure that the Court is made aware of the impact of violence and disorder at and around football matches. What might appear to be an isolated incident by a person of good character e. In R v Hughes [] EWCA Crim , it was held that the mere fact that the defendant was convicted of a relevant offence at a regulated football match would usually be sufficient to satisfy a court that an order might prevent such violence or disorder in the future.

This was followed in R White v Blackfriars Crown Court [] EWHC Admin , where it was held that the importance of the need to deter others was a factor that the court ought to give weight to deciding this issue. Prosecutors should also note R v Curtis [] EWCA Crim , which concerns the making of an order against a first time offender involved in large scale disturbances. Prosecutors should note that deterrence is only a factor to be borne in mind in determining the application; it is not the decisive factor, so that an order will not inevitably follow from a conviction for a football related offence R v Boggild and Others [] EWCA Crim Evidence in support may include a match ticket, programme, fanzine, season ticket, train tickets, football related paraphernalia i.

When the application is made under s. Although Rule It is vital that the prosecutor signs the application at the earliest opportunity. A notice of appeal by either party in relation to the granting or refusal of a FBO must be made no later than 21 days after the decision was made. Annex C and Annex D contain checklists of matters which prosecutors should consider when making an application for a FBO. Where appropriate, consideration should be given to diversion by way of a Youth Caution.

If the offending cannot be satisfactorily addressed by a Youth Caution, then consideration should be given to a Youth Conditional Caution. For further information, prosecutors should consider the separate legal guidance on Youth Offenders and the Director's Guidance on Youth Conditional Cautions. There is a potential conflict between the duty to remit young offenders to the youth court for sentence under s. This conflict has resulted in youths convicted of football related violence and disorder being remitted to their home courts and subsequently applications for Football Banning Orders have been rejected.

Where, however, it is clear that the case is likely to be contested and there are potentially a number of civilian witnesses, then it may be necessary to charge and bail the youth to the "away" court. After conviction, it will be necessary for the prosecutor to make representations, citing the exception in section 8 2 of the Act, stating that it would be undesirable to remit the case to the "home" court, as it would deprive the prosecution of the ability to apply for a banning order.

Careful consideration should be given before a youth is jointly charged with an adult, to avoid the potential problems dealt with above. In cases of large scale disorder it is good practice to charge each defendant separately and for youths to be charged to the "home" court and for the adults to be charged to the "away" court.

When made following conviction under s. If no immediate imprisonment is ordered, the maximum is 5 years and the minimum 3 years. If made under the section 14B, the maximum period of the order is 5 years and the minimum is 3 years.

By virtue of s. Section 23 provides that the court has firstly to make a declaration of relevance and can only do so once it is satisfied that the prosecutor has served a notice on the defendant at least five days before the first day of the trial or the hearing of the application indicating that the prosecution propose to show that the offence related to football matches. The court can waive the requirement for full notice to be given if satisfied it is in the interests of justice.

The defendant may also waive away his rights for full notice. A finding by the court that the offence was football related can be appealed as part of an appeal against sentence. It is important to ask the court to waive the requirements if an offender appears in custody and is dealt with at first hearing. Prosecutors should agree with the police that a notice will be served on the defendant at the time of charge, and provision made for proving service so as to satisfy the court.

It is likely that the court will require a copy notice. Prosecutors should ensure that there is sufficient evidence to prove relevance to a football match and should not feel limited to incidents arising at or near the ground. The courts have stated that it is a matter of judgment whether any of the offences are "related to football matches" see R v Doyle Ciaran and Others [] EWCA Crim and it is perfectly possible for the alleged behaviour to include incidents some considerable distance away from the ground, where the offender is not even a supporter of either team playing.

It will usually be obvious from the circumstances but, if not, additional evidence should be requested from the police. FBOs have successfully been sought for offences over two miles from the ground and five hours after the end of the game, as well as for offences on the national rail network some distance from the game. The court may conduct a hearing analogous to a Newton Hearing to determine the question of relevance. Prosecutors should be properly prepared for such hearings. The use of CCTV evidence may be very persuasive.

Prosecutors should view CCTV material, with the intention of minimising the number of police officers attending court to give evidence. A person who has been given a Football Banning Order FBO must report to a specified police station within five days, and surrender their passport when required by the Enforcing Authority the Football Banning Orders Authority , and report to a police station during the "control periods" associated with "regulated football matches" outside of the UK see s.

Football Banning Orders can be made more effective by the use of schedules containing additional restrictions, such as a restricted zone around a ground for a period of two hours before to two hours after a match, and a prohibition on using the national rail network without the prior approval of the British Transport Police.

Other restrictions may be imposed. The police, especially the Football Intelligence Officer, may have views on what may be effective restrictions on particular individuals. The police may impose conditions from the moment they deem there is sufficient to charge and would have charged but for the Director's Guidance on Charging.

The police may also impose conditions on bail following a release under section 37 2 PACE even if there is insufficient to charge but this should only be imposed where, in the event of a breach, the police investigation is likely to produce a charging decision. Where there is a major operation, this may cause considerable pressure on short term court listing. CPS Areas will need to liaise with the court for an agreed strategy to deal with large number of offenders in custody and on bail.

Additional security may be required to safeguard the court and officials. The court may, on application by the prosecutor, order a person on whom a Football Banning Order has been made to attend a specified police station within seven days at a specified time to have a photograph taken, section 25 of the Public Order Act A power of arrest exists for non-compliance. All Areas should have at least one nominated "lead football prosecutor".

Best practice is for there to be one nominated prosecutor attached to each Premiership and Football League Club, with one "lead" as overall coordinator for the Area, although it is accepted that this may not always be practicable. The success of the improved outcomes will depend on closer working with the police at a senior level.

It has proved to be highly beneficial for the Chief Crown Prosecutor or senior lawyer to liaise with the relevant Police Commander in charge. For specific events, where trouble is anticipated or agreed enforcement action is to take place, it is best practice to have a charging lawyer on duty who will deal with the early advice and charging and through case ownership, and will deal with any subsequent advocacy.

Adverse inferences from silence See Silence, adverse inferences from. Adverse occupation of residential premises defence B See Squatting in residential buildings, offence of. Advertising B4. Aerodromes airports. See Airports. Rules of the Air B Affidavits F8. Affirmations See Oaths and affirmations. Affray SG Supp alternative verdicts B Age air weapons B Merton-compliant determination E Agents admissions F Agents provocateurs A7.

Aggravated burglary alternative verdicts B4. Aggravated criminal damage alternative verdicts B8. Aggravated trespass aggression in international law, crime of B Aggravating factors see also under Individual main entries Racially or religiously aggravated offences. See Racially or religiously aggravated offences.

Aggression in international law, crime of B Aiding, abetting, counselling and procuring accessories. Aircraft British aircraft, offences committed on A8. See Destroying, damaging or endangering safety of aircraft. See Hijacking of aircraft and related offences. Airports See also Aerodromes. Airspace adjacent waters to England and Wales A8.

UK airspace, offences committed in A8. Air weapons 14, persons under B Scotland B Air weapons, carrying SG Supp. Alcohol abnormality of mental functioning B1. See Breath testing equipment ; See Breath tests. See Drink-driving and drug-driving offences. See Drunk and disorderly. See Intoxication. Alcohol offences See also Drink-driving offences. Alcotest R80 F1. Alibi evidence burden of proof F3. Allegations antecedents D Allocation decisions R9.

Alternative offences and verdicts See Verdicts of guilty of alternative offences. Ambush defences D Ammunition SG Supp business, export and other transactions. See Firearms and ammunition, business, export and other transactions involving. See Firearms or ammunition without firearm certificates, possessing etc.

See Weapons or ammunition, possessing or distributing. See also Weapons or ammunition, possessing or distributing. Ancillary relief D8. Animal, intercourse with an elements B3. Animals See also Dangerous dog offences. Animal Welfare Act See Animal Welfare Act , offences under.

Animal Welfare Act , offences under 16, persons under B Anonymity R See Screens, testimony behind. See Witness anonymity. Antecedents bail, refusal of D7. See Civil injunctions. See Closure notices and orders. See Criminal behaviour orders CBOs. Antique firearms ceasing to be an antique B See Bail, appeals relating to. See Case stated. See Convictions, appeals against. See Court of Appeal CA. Court of Justice of the European Union, references to D See Appeals and fair trial requirements.

Newton hearings D See Prosecution appeals. See Sentence, appeals against. See Supreme Court. Appeals and fair trial requirements alternative charges, dealing with A7. Appropriate adult admissions made to appropriate adult D1.

PACE and codes D1. Appropriation in theft abroad and brought into England, property which was B4. Scotland B4. Armed forces arrest, powers of D1. Crown Court jurisdiction D3. Arms trafficking, confiscation orders for E Arraignment and pleas adjournments D See Change of plea. See Deferred prosecution agreements DPAs. See Fitness to plead. See Guilty pleas. See Not guilty pleas. See Plea bargaining. Arranging or facilitating commission of a child sex offence advice, giving B3.

Arranging or facilitating sexual exploitation of a child SG Supp elements B3. Arrest absconding D5. See Assault with intent to resist or prevent arrest. European Arrest Warrant. HM Revenue and Customs, powers of D1. PACE D1. See Resisting arrest. Scotland D1.

See Warrant, arrest under. Wednesbury reasonableness D1. Articles for administering or preparing controlled drugs elements B See Assault occasioning actual bodily harm. See Assault on constables or other officers in execution of duty. See Emergency workers, assaults on. See Robbery. Serious Organised Crime Agency staff, on B2. Assault by penetration 13, child under B3. Assault occasioning actual bodily harm actual bodily harm, definition of B2. Assault of a child under 13 by penetration consent B3.

Assault on constables or other officers in execution of duty actus reus B2.

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Keeping any dangerous wild animal without a licence Keeping any premises for use for an animal fight. Keeping or training an animal for use for in connection with an animal fight Kidnap - taking a person, by force or fraud, without their consent and without lawful excuse Kidnap with intent to commit a sexual offence Knowingly contravening a trade prohibition Knowingly publicising a proposed animal fight.

Providing information to another with the intention of enabling or encouraging attendance at the fight Provision of false information - Election fraud Provision of information, etc. Unregistered selling, manufacture, transfers, repairs of firearms Treating - directly or indirectly,in order to influence corruptly Trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence Trespassing On Land Forming Part Of An Aerodrome.

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At the front, they would be steering the project at Newcastle, shaking hands with their fellow Premier League shareholders. At the back, they would be waging a war against beIn Sports, owned by Qatar, and official rights holders for the Middle East and North Africa. They would be pirating feeds and broadcasting illegally. How could the Premier League welcome an owner with those connections?

And it is true after considering the Newcastle deal, the Premier League regarded the Saudi Arabia Public Investment Fund — which was 80 per cent of the consortium — as part of the Saudi state. It was not a leftfield or controversial conclusion, because everybody else did, too. Saudi Arabia had also repeatedly blocked the League taking legal action against the pirate broadcaster illegally streaming matches.

In many ways, it would be advantageous for the Premier League to be in business with Saudi Arabia. If the piracy issue remained, they could go through the front door and apply pressure. The Saudis would have skin in the game. Richard Masters is taking the heat but Toon takeover died over failure to answer one question.

And once inside, the old adage about tents and the direction of micturition would apply. Except when the Premier League sought to engage their newest owners, it got complex. It is, apparently, very plain who owns and runs Manchester City. Rival clubs do not like sovereign wealth clubs because they are financially strong and hard to beat.

And the consortium must have been aware of this because that was the reason the takeover dragged on for months: the legal conversations, the clarifications, the call and response. Why would he do that when, in all likelihood, he will have to work with these people for the foreseeable future? One imagines he knows why the deal floundered, and the consortium will, too. They will certainly know what the Premier League was asking, and the possible ways forward from there.

Yet they let Masters take the heat and play dumb around the petitioners. Nobody should need months to answer that. Kia Joorabchian has defended his recruitment work at Arsenal while rubbishing the record of former chief scout Sven Mislintat. Joorabchian plays down his influence at the club but his clients have been prevalent among recent signings, including David Luiz and Cedric Soares.

Willian is also his. And, no, Mislintat was far from faultless. He did, however, help land Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang, the only world-class player on the books. If the departing head of recruitment, Francis Cagigao, can live off spotting Cesc Fabregas 17 years ago, there is mileage for Mislintat in Aubameyang yet. Whether it should be managed by a Dutch woman is another matter. The team benefit from significant investment and, for that money, this country should have a coaching system strong enough to produce a native, female candidate.

Still, at least Sarina Wiegman delivers half the profile and has won the Euros with Holland, as well as reaching the World Cup final. She also favours a technical, passing style, which is the only way forward for England. Whether she has the players for it is debatable. Yet progress beyond a direct, physical approach is essential if England are not to fall behind.

A report that several sports organisations have failed to meet gender targets brought swift admonishment from Julian Knight, chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee. Knight appeared to be leaning towards demanding sanctions, given that many of these sports receive public money.

And as the head of a committee with two female members of 11 — two short — he would know. The right team went down from League Two in the end but not for the right reasons. Macclesfield Town deserved to be jettisoned from the competition, having failed to fulfil fixtures and pay players on more than one occasion through the season.

Yet the way the deed was done — after an EFL appeal against a delayed points deduction — smacked of connivance and convenience. By then it was known the number of points that would get Macclesfield relegated. It was almost as if the punishment was tailored to the consequence. And what of Stevenage, who now survive? They have spent 53 days preparing for life outside the league on very different budgets.

Phil Wallace, the chairman, argued that automatic sanctions should be in place — three, six, nine, 12 points for every month the players are not paid. And had Macclesfield lost nine points across this season, they would not have gone down. So a club could default on wages for two months and sail on. That is why a re-election vote in addition to points deductions would be a better solution. That way, the rest of the league — perhaps minus relegated clubs that might be saved — decide on the fitness of its members.

It separates genuine hardship from rogue practice. One imagines Stevenage and Macclesfield would have known their fates long ago. Macclesfield were relegated after getting six-point deduction for misconduct on player wages. Carabao Cup semi-finals will be pared back to one match and there will no longer be FA Cup replays next season to make room in a shortened schedule. That hurt. Morecambe and Wise were on the BBC. Del Boy was on the BBC.

Top of the Pops was on the BBC. Athletics is not. It is on the red button, on iPlayer, on the website. It is like one of those bands at Glastonbury that no mainstream audience want to watch. The BBC rushed out an agreement to show five Diamond League meetings this summer, no doubt in response to reports that it was preparing to drop its deal with UK Athletics.

Yet when athletics mattered, when it was popular, it was prime time and on a prime channel. Maybe not always BBC One but nobody had to search for it. To lose that would be disastrous at a time all sports fear recession. Yet this has been coming.

Athletics has been run with a sense of entitlement for too long — in March, the new UKA chief Joanna Coates even talked arrogantly of turfing West Ham out of their stadium so the Anniversary Games could take place, with its dwindling attendances. The public perception of the sport is too many scandals, too many excuses. There are great, noble, straight-as-a-die athletes, some of whom are listed above. Yet their sport is increasingly doubted and when that happens the audience turn off, turn over or leave that red button well alone.

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And athletics uk criminal aiding abetting a offence pay out on a sport bet

Criminal Law - Parties to a Crime

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of the Crime and Disorder Act should be charged. An association football match (in England and Wales) described in paragraphs to commit that offence, and; A reference to aiding and abetting, counselling or. English criminal law concerns offences, their prevention and the consequences, in England for aiding and abetting, need evidence of actually encouraging a crime; R v Gnango [] UKSC 59 joint enterprise; R v Jogee [] UKSC 8. R v Coney () 8 QBD is an English case in which the Court for Crown Cases Reserved found that a bare-knuckle fight was an assault occasioning actual bodily harm, despite the consent of the participants. This marked the end of widespread public bare-knuckle contests in England. could be put to the jury to support a charge of aiding and abetting the assault.